Author Archives: viv ellis

February 24

Diagnosing 2.0 flatulence: the case of ‘N.G.’

Do you – or someone you know – think you might be suffering from Teacher Quality 2.0 flatulence? Here’s how to tell. Let’s take the case of a hypothetical patient, ‘N.G’, who first came to our attention a few years ago. First of all (and be honest) do you think you are always inevitably right and that […]

February 21

Have an idea for a research-based book on teacher education?

The first book in the ‘Reinventing Teacher Education’ series – The Struggle for Teacher Education (Trippestad, Swennen & Werler) – is now in print and will be on sale soon. The second title – a study of teacher education curricula in the US – by Pasternak and colleagues is about to go into production and in […]

January 26

Teacher Education Exchange: a personal view

In March last year, just as I was joining King’s College London, I organised a seminar on initial teacher education at which Sven-Erik Hansen (Finland) and Ken Zeichner (US) spoke, both leading international researchers in the field. The rest of the room was filled with some of the leaders in the field in the UK, […]

December 08

Review of Learning Teaching from Experience

Meg Maguire has authored a review of Janet Orchard and my edited collection Learning Teaching from Experience: Multiple Perspectives and International Contexts that has been published in the Journal of Education for Teaching (JET). It is available to download if you click here. The book is now available in paperback (for example, via Waterstone’s) and […]

November 11

Two new articles on ‘The Uses of Poetry’

Having said several times recently that I haven’t done research in English Education/language/literacy for a while, I am reminded that, in fact, I have by the publication of two new journal articles on poetry. The articles arose out of the Arts and Humanities Research Council project I was CI on during my time at Brunel. […]

November 08

Innovation: one of ‘those’ words

At the Watson conference, as can happen lots of places, ‘innovation’ was heard with an economic inflection. The word is often associated with technical improvements to commercial processes; increasing efficiency; lowering costs and driving up profitability. Indeed, in the discourses of public service reform, ‘innovation’ can even be a cover for privatisation or at least marketisation; a way […]

October 22

My talk at the Watson conference

As an outsider to Composition and Rhetoric as a discipline, I was really honoured – and also slightly unnerved – to be invited to the 20th biennial Watson Conference at the University of Louisville. Would I be the green jello at the lunchtime buffet of talks? The cold stuffing? The watery collard greens? Anyway, this […]